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A Feminist Reading Of Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

829 words - 4 pages

A Feminist Reading of Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House
Chronicling women's struggles for acceptance and equal status in society as depicted in modern literature: Ibsen's views on feminism in A Doll's House
History bears testimony to the struggles women have had to undergo in trying to realize their rights to freedom and equality of status in society. In all ancient societies girls and women were kept under male subjugation. Unfortunately discrimination on the basis of gender is prevalent in many cultures and societies till this present day.

Women’s desire to equality of social status, right to knowledge and education, right to equal opportunities, right to religion and right to expression ...view middle of the document...

She did not comprehend at first why Torvald refused to see reason and accused her of being just as corrupt as Krogstad. She had hoped deep down and also feared that Torvald would take the entire blame and his status as the Bank Manager would be compromised.
Unfolding of Nora Helmer's Character

As soon as the tarantella dance was over and the Helmers returned home, Nora wanted Torvald to read the letter and get the whole thing over and done with. Her final piece of fantasy was shattered when Torvald, instead of putting himself out for her, rounded off on her and accused her of being a hypocrite and a liar. She had contemplated on a course of action and Torvald’s unjust accusations only helped to steel her resolve to execute her plan.

Nora had been living a life of subterfuge and make belief with Torvald only to maintain peace in the family. She was aware of the male ego and did not want Torvald to feel threatened so she played dumb most of the time. The fact was that not only was she more capable than him but was also more than a match for him intellectually. She was the one who had bailed the family out of financial crisis during Torvald’s illness.
Strength of a Woman

Nora had given her love to Torvald and their children unconditionally. She had...

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