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American Revolution: The Siege Of Charleston

1636 words - 7 pages

The American Revolution: the war for our independence. This revolution opened the door to our liberty, freedom, and basically what America is now. Most Americans have heard the stories of famous battles, important people (George Washington for instance), and everything in between. However, this was only for our side of the American Revolution and a small fraction of people have been told of Britain’s campaign of the revolution. The only thing people have been told was the Britain lost the war. What of Britain’s triumphs, strategies, and everything that happened in the span of a few years? Not many people know it, but the British struck a major blow against the Patriots in the last few years ...view middle of the document...

theamericanrevolution.org). After much talk Britain made a decision: to take the South. During the winter of 1778, the British took control of the cities of Savannah and Augusta (www.theamericanrevolution.org). Once the Tories took the cities, the British began preparations of capturing a vital city: Charleston, South Carolina (www.theamericanrevolution.org).
Back in the United States, the Continental Congress was preparing a response to the loss of Georgia in December, 1778 (www.theamericanrevolution.org). The Congress decided to replace North Carolinian Major General Robert Howe with Bostonian Major General Benjamin Lincoln in the Southern Department (www.theamericanrevolution.org). With great success in the North leading the New England Militia, the Continental Congress hoped General Lincoln would be able to retake Georgia. Later in May 11, 1779, Benjamin was able retake parts of Georgia and was later joined by French Admiral d’Estaing in laying siege to fully retake Georgia (www.theamericanrevolution.org). Heading into October of 1779, Admiral d’Estaing abandoned the siege and sailed to the West Indies for the winter. Even though victory was inevitable, General Lincoln was forced to give up the siege because of no support (www.theamericanrevolution.org). He fell back to Charleston, South Carolina allowing the British to keep Georgia.
With Georgia under control, General Clinton sailed off from New York to Charleston in December of 1779. Clinton’s fleet consisted of ninety troop ships and fourteen warships (www.theamericanrevolution.org). His entire ground force was more than 8,500 sailors (www.theamericanrevolution.org) and 14,000 soldiers (www.historyofwar.org). Clinton crossed the Ashley River and fortified on the Charleston Neck on March 29th, 1780 under the cover of fog (www.theamericanrevolution.org). After some time, General Clinton and his British forces moved into Charleston to begin siege (www.theamericanrevolution.org).
On April 2nd, 1780, General Clinton began his siege on Patriot forces of Charleston. The Colonists were not prepared for any siege (www.hubpages.com). Parts of the Carolina regiments were very hungry or sick. Most soldiers were so low fed that people could see a soldier’s bones (www.hubpages.com). However, Britain was well prepared and in high spirits for success. With a force of more than 14,000 (www.historyof war.org) and multiple artillery, trenches and other siege of ideals, Britain was sure of winning this battle (www.shmoop.com).
During the battle, Patriot and Militia forces were outflanked, outgunned, and majorly outnumbered. The Patriots were even forced to used broken shovels, glass, etc. as artillery shells (www.shmoop.com). British forces however, quickly hammered down Patriot and Militia with artillery causing lines to scatter as artillery decimated the Colonists (www.hubpages.com). General Clinton carefully took the city little by little, effectively taking Charleston (however, this was unlike...

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