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Analysis Of Brock Clarke's, An Arsonist’s Guide To Writer’s Homes In New England

840 words - 4 pages

In the 2007 novel” An Arsonist’s Guide to Writer’s Homes in New England”, by Brock Clarke, is a story within a story about a man named Sam Pulisifer. Sam as a teenager accidentally torches an American landmark in Amherst, Emily Dickinson’s Home and kills a young couple, Linda and David Coleman, which was up stairs in a bed. After serving ten years in prison for his crime, Sam tries to put his past behind him. He gets his GED, goes to college and majors in plastics, falls in love with Ann Marie and gets married to her; they have two adorable children and buy a home in Camelot.
Camelot was a perfect place Sam thought, the perfect neighborhood where no one knew him or his past. He tries to ...view middle of the document...

His parents have mutated into wrecks he can barely recognize them or the home where they live.
Earlier in the novel, it tells that Sam for a while had no communications with his parents for many years because his parents took Sam’s crime of arson and murder hard. His mother, Elizabeth, was a high school English teacher and his father, Bradley, was an editor for a small university press. They both become alcoholic, and give up on books all together after many years. Sam goes back home, his father shows him a box that has 137 screwed up letters writers begging him to burn down those famous writer’s houses a decade ago. The story goes on and famous writer’s homes go up in smoke and till the end Sam finds out that his father, Bradley’s mistress, Deirdre is starting the fires and burning down the landmarks for spite and maybe because she is jealous of Sam and his father’s relationship after Sam’s released from prison . Sam also finds out that his father has been having an affair for 30 years, and never went on any trips Sam thought he did when he was a child and that his mother Beth wrote and sent him those postcards. By the end of the story, Deirdre killed her self by setting her self on fire while Sam watches her while...

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