Anna Karenina And A Doll's House: Feminist And Marxist Critisism

874 words - 4 pages

Introduction
At the time Anna Karenina and A Doll’s House were written, both published around the 1870s, Russian women were primarily under the control of their fathers and husbands. For this very reason, marriage was, in a way, a career goal for Russian women at that time. This feeds into the marxist theme because every character in each novel is In both Anna Karenina and A Doll’s House, the problems Anna and Nora face from the marxist perspectives of the time are heavily compounded by their gender.
Anna Karenina and Feminism
In that sense Anna had her life set. She was married with a child to a wealthy man of high social standing
Anna Karenina and Marxism

A Doll’s House and ...view middle of the document...

(citation, 70?) After Nora states her desire to leave, Torvald says that she is insane because ,in his eyes, Nora’s only duty in life is to serve her family. So in her leaving, she denied what society said was her purpose for existence. Nora was not simply a woman leaving her family behind. She was a woman searching desperately for independence from a society in which the rule of men was forced upon her based on her gender.
“I believe that before anything else, I’m a human being, just as much of as you are…or at least I’m going to try to turn myself into one,” Nora says to Torvald in her moment of self-awakening. (citation) This has been every woman’s goal throughout history. Nora Helmer in A Doll’s House triumphs over all obstacles placed in her way by society and for the first time, realizes her duties to herself have always been placed on the backburner for the men in her life. Yet, many more women are still forced to continue to shatter the image of a doll placed on them by the society we live in.
A Doll’s House and Marxism
In Marxism, it is believed that any given person’s thoughts, behaviors, and relationship with others are all influenced by the individual’s social class and economic standing.(citation) This translates well into one of the main themes of A Doll’s...

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