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Aspects Of Romanticism In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

1246 words - 5 pages

The world around us holds so many different things. There is the natural beauty of nature, found in waterfalls, and forests, deserts and beaches, that help us to appreciate where we come from. There is the supernatural, almost the exact opposite, being something that we either envy and want or despise and fear, such as witches and vampires, superheroes and magic. Everything we feel as people, as individuals plays into what we want and how we act. All of these things are aspects of Romanticism, which we can see in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.
Nature has a soothing and healing affect. There is poison ivy which will irritate your skin, but growing near it in the surrounding area, is ...view middle of the document...

By creating new life, and in essence, playing God, Victor upsets the balance in the world which becomes a major hazard later on. The monster, who is created from various men or “raw materials” as Victor calls them, to soothe his conscience, is ghastly to look at due to the stitches and scars that cover his body. Who wouldn’t be afraid of something so hideous, “his yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath” (56), standing above all humans, a towering 8 feet tall, and his strength is enormous, able to crush bones in seconds. The monster appears to learn quickly, able to master the art of speech over a few months, where it takes humans years to learn how to talk in full and complete sentences. Almost all of his attributes are increased to “super human” level, strength beyond normal, his height, his intelligence, and his capacity for emotion. He can love, he can hate, he can fear, and they are all taken to an extreme level. He falls in love, on a non romantic level, with Safie and Felix, wanting the best for them and caring for them, showing a very protective side, finding great joy in bringing happiness to “his” family. After being run from the hovel the monster lives in the forest, his body better equipped to the harsh conditions and bitter temperatures, allowing him to live in the Arctic desert where Victor ultimately tracks him. Though the monster needs substance to live on and he feels the pangs of hunger he never needs to cook, as he tells Victor “my food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment” (139). These aspects of the creature are all part of the supernatural world that Shelley creates to draw the reader into her book.
The psychological aspect of Romanticism as shown in Shelley's novel is seen during the deaths of William, Justine, Elizabeth, Alphonse and Henry. The story is narrator mainly by Captain Walton who retells the story that Victor Frankenstein tells him via letters to his sister. The story is told by Walton, Victor, and the monster, at times being narrating by Elizabeth and Alphonse through letter that are sent to Victor while he is away at school. Each death takes a different toll on Victor. The first death he is incredibly remorseful over, the death of William, his young and innocent brother. Victor automatically assumes that the murder is the work of his own monstrous creation and immediately goes out to find the monster. After...

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