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Brave New World Essay

562 words - 3 pages

Brave New World The day when nature no longer controlled life, and technology and industry was all that mattered has been prophesized many times in past generations. The end of life as we know it has always been associated with the mechanized world, and is the world Aldous Huxley displays in his novel Brave New World. Huxley's novel is a satire. It is a social criticism while at the same time a prophetic warning. It critiques the social barriers and restrictions our world sets upon social classes. He sees the world as a caste system, where the rich are rich and the poor are poor. The romantic illusion that it is possible to elevate social standing is not only unrealistic, but also ridiculous, and is one of the satiric points ...view middle of the document...

Gammas are stupid...". Other points of satire are made regarding birth and parents. In this new world, the thought of being born is obscene. The thought of having a mother and a father is a joke, and is seen as dirty and wrong, "The word (for "˜father' was not so much obscene as-with its connotation for something at one remove from the loathsomeness and moral obliquity of child bearning-merly gross, a scatological rather than a pornographic impropriety)." Along with the industrialization of the reproductive process, Huxley points out that this world is also, like a machine, incapable of having feelings of love. No one is to have any affection towards another human being. An example of this is when the World Controller tells Bernard, ""¦that I'd had any indecorous relation with the girl. Nothing emotional, nothing longdrwan. It was all perfectly healthy and normal." Huxley's style of writing reflects the world he is trying to paint. The writing is cold, the description is superficial, the characters have no deep personalities, and everything seems very factual. There is a lack of any sentiment or emotion in the writing, which virtually lacks literary devices such as metaphors and similes. The writing is cold, like the machines of the brave new world. He uses high diction in many places, such as ""¦obscene as-with its connotation for something at one remove from the loathsomeness and moral obliquity of child bearning-merly gross, a scatological rather than a pornographic impropriety)." The elevated tone and the fact that the writing is never directed at the reader distance it from the audience, and help create the isolated work, which is like the new world, isolated from human nature.

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