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Challenging The American Dream Essay

1141 words - 5 pages

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Challenging the American Dream
Introduction
Following the end of the Second World War, the US was the best place to be in terms of getting the best education, the best jobs, and a haven for peace and stability. This meant that it was the best place to have a family and raise children given the fact that there were no racial extremities witnessed in Europe during the Second World War. Today, however, things have changed; people have problems starting families and supporting each other within the family while still pursuing the American Dream. The long working hours for both the men and women alike means that raising children and teaching them of the ...view middle of the document...

It is true that Americans have always had the can do belief; they have been dreamers able of making things happen. It was very easy to start and raise a family well, even for those who did not manage to attend college. Accessing quality education was not a reserve of the reach but for everyone determined to go through with their studies; the quality of education was also very high. Achieving success was easy for those who were ready to work hard despite of ones socio-economical background. According to Butler (46), Americans did not only dream the dream, they were able to achieve the dream. However, the basic tenets of the American Dream have been questions and a heated debate has arisen with respect to the true status of the American Dream, and its attainability.
Discussion
As a result of the state of the economy, especially recession, many people have lost their jobs, especially those who had high school level education or less, majority of whom have been the working class of the lower class. Sawhill and Morton's report on mobility project suggests that, since the economy began to recover from the recession, most people who had lost their jobs, those with high education or less, can no longer find new jobs. Proponents of this debate argue that, the economic challenges spurred by recession, such as the unequal and uneven access to jobs/employment has led to a difficulty in the attainment of success as stipulate by the American Dream. This has worsened income inequality and has further widened the gap between the rich and the poor (Francis).
Hochschild and Scovronick (278) asserted that, the system of education in America was effective, strict and allowed for mobility with respect to access to quality education regardless of one’s family background. Children from poor family backgrounds who were ready to work hard in school had the capability of rising through classes and possibly end up at a different position as their parents. This is what the American Dream envisioned and what many who still believe that the American Dream is alive and attainable believe in. However, compared to education systems of other countries, the United States Education System is today less effective in as far enabling children realizing their full potential regardless of their social strata. In seem like the merit based education...

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