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Criminology Essay

2412 words - 10 pages

How is Criminology Similar to a Science? How is Criminology Different from a Science?

Introduction

The purpose of this paper is to explain the elements and characteristics that explain how criminology is similar to other sciences such as biology, chemistry and physics and more. This paper will also distinguish the differences and limitations of how criminology cannot be considered a true science such as chemistry, physic and biology. Before I begin to compare and contrast, I will first express exactly what criminology is and the job that being a criminologist entails, as well as define what is a science and what scientist do. Many have no idea what criminology mean. ...view middle of the document...

By studying normal and abnormal social behaviors, as well as patterns that lead to criminal activity, criminologists try to understand what causes people to commit illegal acts and what can be done to prevent crimes and capture criminals. What is science? Science is the concerted human effort to understand, or to understand better, the history of the natural world and how the natural world works, with observable physical evidence as the basis of that understanding1. It is done through observation of natural phenomena, and/or through experimentation that tries to simulate natural processes under controlled conditions (Uga.edu). Due to the constant changes and experiments scientist are always working on new theories and coming up with discovering several hypothesis. Scientist also is one who engages in activities to acquire knowledge. In a more restricted sense, a scientist is an individual who uses the scientific method. Scientists are usually experts in one or more areas of science. Both criminologist and scientist have significant jobs. In the first part of the paper I will explain the many ways of how criminology and science are alike and in the second part I will explain the significant difference and limitation of how criminology cannot be considered a true science.

Discussion
The Similarities
Many individuals may not consider how criminology can in fact be understood as a science such as electromagnetic physics, molecular biology, inorganic chemistry, environment science and more, but in the book Criminology Theory: An Analysis of its Underlying Assumptions it in fact will explain that there are definite similarities. In fact, criminology can be considered a science. Criminology is a science which is widely studied for its' own sake, just like other sciences; crime and criminals are not a bit less interesting than stars or microbes. Both criminology and science is the study and discovery of something. They both go hand in hand because according to “Criminological Theory: An Analysis of its Underlying Assumptions” (2006) their theories both explain cause and effect, human behaviors, and prevention. Both criminologist and scientist collect information to test new ideas or to disprove old ones. Scientists become famous for discovering new things that change how we think about nature, whether the discovery is a new species of dinosaur, a medicine that is develop the can cure something or a new way in which atoms bond, they are discovering observing and investigating from different angles. Both find their greatest joy in previously unknown facts that explains some problem previously not explained, or that overturns some previously accepted idea. While criminologist builds and discovers theories that explain why crimes occur and test those theories by observing behavior. Dealing with science and criminology the scientific method is used repetitively, especially dealing with cause and effect.
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