Huxley's A Brave New World Vs The Tempest

568 words - 3 pages

Huxley’s “Brave New World” a World where technology is ruled and feelings are neglected, and Shakespeare “The Tempest” where revenge and love is basis of the novel.
However by juxtaposing both Huxley “Brave New Word” and Shakespeare “The Tempest” they have many similarities between each other.
Evidently their would be no suitable title than what Huxley uses for his novel “Brave New World” especially when the structure of this new world is different than what any human has encountered. The opens in the ventral London “Hatching and Conditioning Centre” and the first chapter reads as there is a list of stunning scientific achievements: human cloning, rapid maturation, and prenatal conditioning. However through Huxley tone and diction this new world is no where near a utopia, but the exact ...view middle of the document...

Ironically the novel came by Shakespeare historical book “The Tempest”
John a character not from the world state born “different” is interested in world sate being raised only by hearing his mother Linda’s fabulous stories of the World State, and literature from Shakespeare, which he uses the express his feelings which is sometimes thought of as comical within the World State. However Shakespeare characters in “The Tempest” and World State Characters provides an important parallel to one another. The two texts relate to each other on many levels. In the play, Prospero and his daughter Miranda are exiled to an island because Prospero’s brother betrayed him in order to gain political control. Just as Bernard betrayed John when fighting the police after the death of his mother, in order to remain accepted in the World State Community. While on the island Prospero and Miranda find a native, Caliban, to who’s deceased mother the island had belonged. Prospero usurps control of the island and decides to raise Caliban as a slave because he pities him and intends to civilize him, Shakespeare introduces Caliban as a angry, violent figure, who could easily be interpreted as less than human, which bear a resemblance to John by the end of text when he is fed up with the World State. Prospero then uses his magical powers to give revenge to his betrayers, when the ship arrives to the island two of the stewards introduce Caliban to liquor, and liquor becomes Caliban’s “God” just as citizens of the World State feel “Soma is Christianity without the tears”. Even though Prospero purports to help Caliban by “civilizing” him, but Caliban resents Prospero for the theft of his home. In “The Tempest” Caliban is considered both a “savage” and a “Noble Savage,” he is utterly displaced in every community, just as john is on the Reservation and Inside the World States.

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