Love In The Odyssey Essay

1254 words - 6 pages

How does love govern a family? It governs husbands to return to their wives, to go on a journey to home. We have all been on a journey. A journey, however, does not usually include coming home. The Odyssey is Odysseus’s journey home to his family. Home is where the family is. While the relationship in a healthy family is communication, there are some instances in the Odyssey where there is an unhealthy relationship. In the Odyssey, are the families that are portrayed ‘rooted and grounded in love?” The loving relationship of family had valuable impact on Odysseus, that he made the journey home, while other families became scattered.
Odysseus loves his family and desires to return despite ...view middle of the document...

” After Orestes killed his father’s murderer, he also slaughtered his mother, for destroying the bond of family. Athena also spoke of father and sons as. “Few sons are like their fathers: most are worse, a few excel their parents.” As shown the role of fatherhood is significant, just as the quest of the son is to learn from his father
The son of the Odysseus, though he has never seen his father, valiantly defends and believes that he is not dead. He also tries to step into his father’s shoes. He is inexperienced, nonetheless. Yet, this is soon resolved though interactions with Athena and his journey to Pylos and Sparta. Telemachos does not have just hope that his father is alive, but sound faith. We as Christians in the same manner, have faith that our Heavenly Father will come someday to take us home to eternal felicity, our eternal family. In addition, In the Odyssey, we see how the family regards growing up. As head man of his father’s estate Telemachos regards his mother with courtesy and respect. He does, however, rebuke her at times. When she comes down from her bedchamber moved by a barb’s song to tears, Telemachos reprimands her, saying if she did not wish to hear the song, she should go to her own quarters. Thus, Telemachos assets growing into adulthood by the way he interacts with his mother, taking control of the relationship.
In the same manner of fatherhood is the role of motherhood. Mothers are the givers of pity and sorrow. They are not active supporters of their sons and husbands when they go on military quests. Mothers, such as Penelope need support and guidance because they are weak and fragile. In the text, mothers serve little function aside for mourning for their men and urging them to remain safe. In contrast, the value placed on fathers and sons is far greater in the Odyssey than on mothers and daughters. For Odysseus’s mother, Anticlea cannot see reason to exist without her son. While waiting for her son to return she dies. Just as Anticlea, the mothers in the Odyssey sole purpose is to look after, nurture, and protect their sons and husbands. Penelope in this sense is a wonderful mother, though she fails to guide her son in manliness and give him love and praise when he most needs it.
Another relationship in the Odyssey that involves “rooted and grounded in love” is marriage. In fact, Odysseus’s marriage is just this. He made his marriage be out of a living tree. This symbolizes that love is like a tree. It starts at the roots, then moves upwards, forming the branches and the leaves....

Other Essays Like Love In The Odyssey

"The Important Roles Of Women In The Odyssey"

1593 words - 7 pages The Women of the OdysseyMany people regard Homer's epics as war stories--stories about men; those people often overlook the important roles that women play in the Odyssey. While there are not many female characters in the Odyssey, the few that there are, play pivotal roles in the story and one can gain a lot of insight by analyzing how those women are portrayed. Homer portrays the females in contradictory ways: the characters of Athena and

The Strong Character Of Penelope In Homer's Odyssey

1993 words - 8 pages The Strong Character of Penelope in Homer's Odyssey   Homer's Odyssey is a story of the homecoming of Odysseus after the Trojan War.  Odysseus left his wife, Penelope, and their young son, Telemachos, almost twenty years before the telling of this story to fight in the Trojan War.  His absence places Penelope in a rather precarious position.  Faced with many different circumstances, both good and bad, Penelope is on her own to decide the

The Destiny of Man and Environment in Jean Sasson's Love in a Torn Land

5232 words - 21 pages The Destiny of Man and Environment in Jean Sasson's Love in a Torn Land Dr. Azad Hamad Sharif Instructor Department of English

Who Is The I And The You In The "Love Song"? A Personal Response Paper About T.S. Eliot's "The Love Song Of J Alfred Prufrock"

592 words - 3 pages T. S. Eliot's The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock describes the consciousness of a modern, nuerotic individual incapable of any real emotional interaction. Prufrock is Eliot's definition of the modern man; an over-educated, eloquent, sexually retarded, yet sensitive thinker. He is the "I" and the speaker of the poem. The poem circles around a formless and vague center, the "one" whom Prufrock addresses. Prufrock's potential lover, this "you

The Representation of Family and Sexuality in “Brave New World” and “Love on the Dole”

1941 words - 8 pages The Representation of family and sexuality in “Brave new world” and “Love on the Dole” Through the centuries, both family life and sexuality were very important to every human being, not only as a mean of procreation, but also as an irreplaceable source of mental stability and happiness. Both equally important - when the child is born as an effect of procreation, there must be a family to raise it. Unfortunately, even today

The Themes Of Love And Hate In William Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

796 words - 4 pages The Themes of Love and Hate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet This essay is about the contrast of love and hate in the play by Shakespeare "Romeo and Juliet". The essay tells you about how Shakespeare uses language and actions to promote the themes of love and hate and contrast throughout the play. The way he uses certain characters as love and others as hate and how change the story line with the contrast

How Does Shakespeare Present the Theme of Love in His Play 'Much Ado About Nothing

1438 words - 6 pages How does Shakespeare present the theme of love through the pairs of lovers in Much Ado About Nothing? In the play Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare presents his views of love in quite a few different, and sometimes very contrasting ways.He uses well thought out and life like characters to explore his views on love and marriage, and especially uses Hero and Claudio to show the problems of love and relationships in those times.These views of

The Trouble And Pain Associated With Love In Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

1173 words - 5 pages The Shakespearean tragedy “Romeo and Juliet” represents the idea that love incurs a price through a range of dramatic techniques. In this play, it becomes very clear that intense and sudden passionate love brings hurt and pain to the lovers involved, as well as their family and friends. In the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet reinforce the idea of unrequited love brings emotional hurt to the lover is conveyed through the representation

Explore the Love Between Parent and Children in Death of a Salesman

653 words - 3 pages Death of a Salesman is centred on the relationships within the Loman family as they realise the cruel nature of the consumerist world of late 1940s America, where the American dream was a lost hope for many. Biff’s love of his father is physically manifested in the action of crying towards the end of the play. When Biff ‘breaks down, sobbing’ it is clear that his epiphany has made him realise his love for his father, but he does not want

This Paper Is A Reaction Article Abot Love And Mate Selection In The 1990's

744 words - 3 pages The Article I read dealt with love and how little or large a part it plays in who we choose to spend the rest of our lives with. Over the last few years I've dated my share of men, and after reading this article I realize that I have my own list of qualities for rating men and it has changed over the years. You might be thinking, "Oh that's awful," but it is my belief that every one does this, or has done this to a certain extent.In this article

Paralysis as Theme in the Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

1739 words - 7 pages Paralysis as Theme in The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is one of the most influential poems of the twentieth century (Williams 49). It is certainly not a love song like any that had been written before. The second and third lines shock the reader because of their unusual imagery that would be out of place in a traditional love poem, describing the setting sunlit sky as looking "like a patient etherised

Related Papers

Xenia In The Odyssey Essay

1340 words - 6 pages Xenia in the Odyssey In Homer’s epic poem “The Odyssey,” xenia or hospitality is an important theme to the Greek culture; it is shown by inviting any stranger, or beggar that arrives into their home and offering them food, a bath, and a place to sleep. In the Odyssey, there are several examples of good xenia provided by Telemachus, Nestor, Menelaus and the Phaeacians (Davis). The Cyclops, Circe, Calypso and the suitors do not obey the

Hospitality In The Odyssey Essay

417 words - 2 pages Hospitality in The Odyssey serves as the moral code, following the rules shows high morality and not obeying them demonstrates immorality. Three aspects of hospitality are displayed that show the reader how moral the characters are: those who welcome without question, those who neglect their duty as hosts, and those who abuse the hospitality that is extended to them. Both the guest and the host behave properly when Telemachus visits King

Hospitality In The Iliad And Odyssey

3533 words - 15 pages The Gods of Hospitality in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey In Homer’s the Iliad and the Odyssey, much is made of hospitality as a recurring theme. In Ancient Greece the gods demand it. The nature and extent to which society today follows in that tradition has changed in form only, but not in substance. Food, shelter and protection of strangers from cultural norms of today, as the people of Ancient Greece were more inclined to take in strangers

Gift Giving In Beowulf And The Odyssey

1715 words - 7 pages Gift-Giving in Beowulf and the Odyssey Literature has always been an immensely helpful resource when discerning cultural values in societies past and present. Through the study of noteworthy historic fictional and factual, texts we are able to distinguish parallel characteristics present through many different cultures and time periods. These distinguishing characteristics are one of the main things that help us to determine when and how a