This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Meeting The Demand For Clergy In Victorian England

1329 words - 6 pages

Meeting the Demand for Clergy in Victorian England

 
Many new changes came to Victorian England as a result of the age of industrialization. Where there were once small country parishes, manufacturing towns were springing up. One change resulting from industrialization was the shortage of clergy to fill the new parishes in these towns. These new parishes reflect the demographic changes of the English countryside. Rural villages grew into booming towns. Where a single parish was once sufficient, there was now a need for multiple parishes. The Church of England went about meeting these demands for new clergy in two major ways, actively recruiting men to the clergy and restructuring ...view middle of the document...

A small percentage (14%) came from small theological colleges. Many people could not afford to send their sons to these universities for the length of time required to become ordained. The combination of the increased demand in number of clergy needed and the time restriction for development created a crisis. The result of this crisis, was the development of the lesser theological colleges for the non-ordained and vocationally trained clergy.. This caused a number of issues to be raised. The result of this trend was " the growth of non-university clergy and the inadequacy of its theological instruction" (qtd. in Haig 11). It stands to reason that given the reduce amount of time given to instruction, coupled with the development of new colleges, that quality may be given up for quantity. The amount of theological training was less so to some it probably seemed inadequate comparatively.

In addition to the shortage in mere numbers of clergy, there had been discord within the church. Many of its faithful didn’t attend services regularly because there was so much division on what doctrine to follow and what was most important. The general population looked to the church to serve only the basic need. Church historian John Kent argues that "What ordinary people wanted from the church was its occasional offices-from baptism to burial which function as rites of passage" (Kent 113). People were not happy with the clergy and its ministries because they felt the clergy was trying to change them instead of giving them what they felt that they needed. They looked to the church only for the performance of the required rituals. With this feeling of dissatisfaction with the clergy abounding, many men were not enticed to become ministers. The church was fighting both low parish involvement on the one hand and rapid creation of large towns of Anglicans demanding even the basic of services such as baptisms, marriages and burials.

These negative stigmas led to the need for aggressive recruitment techniques. The upper classes were appealed to on one level and the lower class on another level. The appeal to the upper class came in the means of placing the younger sons in an established and respectable profession. This had been true for some time but until now these younger sons were not actively recruited for the clergy. They were recruiting the younger sons because the oldest son inherited everything else and the younger sons had to find a profession where they could maintain their social status. The fact that this position involved little pay was of no consequence to the upper class. They were usually able to supplement their income from their family’s wealth. The Church advertised that "Church benefices may thus be found for the provision of younger sons and nobles" (qtd. in Haig 8). This allowed the younger sons to be placed in parishes where they could still enjoy their social status and practice their profession as well.

The lower classes were appealed to...

Other Essays Like Meeting the Demand for Clergy in Victorian England

Supply, Demand, and Government in the Markets

813 words - 4 pages display a price that is below the intersection point. Because there is such a high demand for the product, the consumer would be willing to pay more to obtain it. As the market price increases, the demand will decrease and will eventually cease at the intersection of the two curves, thus reaching Market equilibrium price. 3. Now suppose the government imposes a special tax on these computers. Describe what would happen in this market, in terms

Marks & Spencer: an Analysis of the Demand for a M&S Simply Food Convenience Store in Complexe Desjardins

3755 words - 16 pages ’ eagerness for diversity in menu options. Thus, it is evident that the taste preferences of the consumers are in line with some of the Simply Food products. However, the absence of responses concerning vegetables and microwavable meals suggest a lack of demand for such items. Table 4: Appeal of Food Products   |   | Salads | Sandwiches | Desserts | Juices | Fruits | N | Valid | 74 | 73 | 74 | 73 | 74 | | Missing | 20 | 21 | 20 | 21 | 20

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and the Victorian Age

1766 words - 8 pages Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and the Victorian Age The so-called Victorian Age, the years from the reign of Queen Victoria (1837) and the end of the Boer War (1902), is the time in which the author of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”, Lewis Carroll, lived. For this reason we can find some references to this period in his book concerning to British policy, Victorian morality, habits and traditions. Carroll satirized his society through

The Union's Demand For Recognition And Bargaining Rights

824 words - 4 pages Case 15-1: The Union’s Demand for Recognition and Bargaining Rights In case study 15-1 a union representative made claims against a company of unfair labor practices. The Union also claimed that this was in violation of Section 8(a)(1) of the LMRA. The Union organizer claimed that the company had interrogated the employees to decipher if a union was being established in the company. Melton, the supervisor of the employees at the time of

Explore the Ways in Which Hamlet Responds to the Ghost’s Demand for Revenge. What Impressions of Him Might an Audience Gain?

749 words - 3 pages Explore the ways in which Hamlet responds to the Ghost’s demand for revenge. What impressions of him might an audience gain? In the play Hamlet by Shakespeare, there is a strong theme of revenge. This begins with the Ghost of King Hamlet urging his own son to revenge his murder. The Ghost reveals that he was killed by Claudius, and expresses his disgust that Gertrude is now married to him. Even before knowing the details of his father’s

The Impact Of Changes In Supply, Demand, And Pricing

813 words - 4 pages Generally we are affected by changes in our environment in many different ways. People reactions to those almost any change will vary. With the increased technology we have become accustom to products which provide us with convince, and often feel they are necessary for us to maintain existence. Sudden changes in supply and demand and pricing could lead us to analyze our need for a particular product or service, and consider using alternative

A Comparison Between The Victorian And The Contemporary Couple In A.S Byatt's Possession

4537 words - 19 pages Bailey develops in parallel with and is intermingled with the story of the Victorian lovers, Randolph Henry Ash and Christabel LaMotte, since the modern academics' quest for knowledge of the past drives the modern romance. While the Victorian love affair is characterized by its passionate intensity, the other relation develops slowly compared to the customs of late twentieth century with its sexual freedom. Sexuality is another

Compare Sources a and B as Evidence for Henry Vii Claim to the Throne of England

1121 words - 5 pages Compare sources A and B as evidence for Henry VII’s claim to the throne of England [30] On comparing sources A and B as evidence for Henry VII’s claim to the throne in 1485, it can be said both have relevant use as both give an account of events at the time of Henry VII’s coronation. However it is questionable how reliable each of the two sources are because of the position of the authors in relation to King Henry VII and their willingness to

Explain the Concept of Price Elasticity of Demand and Discuss Its Relevance for Business and Government

1823 words - 8 pages Explain the concept of Price Elasticity of Demand and discuss its relevance for Business and Government Price elasticity of demand According to the law of demand: the lower the price the more product is bought. But consumer response to changes in price can vary significantly from product to product. Economists measure the response (sensitivity) of consumers to changes in product prices, using the concept of price elasticity.The gist of the

Increasing Demand for Trendy Yet Comfortable Footwear to Set the Tone for Footwear Sales Globally, Says Tmr

702 words - 3 pages footwear. Sports activities have significantly increased globally and so has the demand for comfortable footwear. Moreover, a surge in health and fitness activity is also noted. This has compelled leading sports brands to manufacturing technically more sophisticated and innovative footwear. Footwear Manufacturers Seizing Opportunities in Proliferation of Retail Culture As per a lead analyst in TMR, “Footwear manufacturers are also expected

Increasing Demand for Trendy Yet Comfortable Footwear to Set the Tone for Footwear Sales Globally, Says Tmr

702 words - 3 pages footwear. Sports activities have significantly increased globally and so has the demand for comfortable footwear. Moreover, a surge in health and fitness activity is also noted. This has compelled leading sports brands to manufacturing technically more sophisticated and innovative footwear. Footwear Manufacturers Seizing Opportunities in Proliferation of Retail Culture As per a lead analyst in TMR, “Footwear manufacturers are also expected

Related Papers

Jane Eyre And A Woman's Role In Victorian England

829 words - 4 pages Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is a novel well ahead of it’s time, especially regarding the role of women in a society in which they were very subservient to the desires and whims of men, even more so than today. Jane Eyre is a young woman who struggles with those facts all her life and when she becomes engaged to her employer, Mr. Rochester, she finds herself in even more turmoil. Jane is being very contrary as preparations for her wedding reach

A Meeting In The Dark Essay

1071 words - 5 pages sinned too when he was young by sleeping with Susana who become pregnant with John. It is stated that “John must not tread the same road” (Thiong’o, 6) like Stanley and Susana, but history tends to repeat itself. John is then consumed by a moral dilemma that he eventually fails to face. Stanley is to blame for John murdering Wamuhu. Stanley is the force behind John, in the text Stanley is seen as a strict person, feared by all in the village

Dealing With Practical Issues Of Capacity And Meeting Customers Demand For Benny Chicken

4607 words - 19 pages the practical issues of capacity and issues of meeting customer demand. I will be using information that I have gathered from my research such as questionnaires and interviews, and I will be combining it with my academic knowledge to provide a report on these 3 Objectives;2.5SECTION ONEWhich of slacks 5 performance objectives are most vital to there success in the market place?.2.6SECTION TWOAnalyse and calculate 3 Capacities and Outputs of the

Cultural Trends In The Victorian Era

809 words - 4 pages Cultural Trends The Victorian age was a time greatly influenced by cultural trends influenced the growing industrialization of the era. Trends and movements such as The Great Exhibition of 1851, The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, The Arts and Crafts Movement and the Medieval/Gothic Revival, transformed England into a culture with a passion for visual advancement. In 1849, Paris held one of several national exhibitions, showcasing products