One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest Book To Movie

961 words - 4 pages

By: Poop
A writer named Ken Kesey who worked as a security guard at a mental institution, was inspired to write a book about it. In 1961 Kurk Douglas received the book in galley form. The title read “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” He fell in love with the book and soon he bought the rights to it. He had no idea that this book would one day become one of the best films ever made. “Douglas was naïve enough to think that you could make a picture of any book you wanted to, you just got permission and you made it, you made the picture.”- Saul Zaentz (Producer) [Interview] There was a tremendous process in tranforming “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” into a film.
Douglas first had the book ...view middle of the document...

Soon one by one all the characters were casted; Louise Fletcher as Nurse Ratched, Danny DeVito as Martini, and Christopher Lloyd as Taber. Chief was the hardest role to cast. Scouts were sent everywhere in search for an enormous Indian Native American actor to play Chief. One of these scouts was Mel Lambert. One day he called Micheal Douglas and said he had found him, the biggest son of a gun he had ever seen. His name was Will Sams from Washington State, and he was perfect for the role. [Lupack, Barbara, Take Two: Adapting the Contemporary American Novel to Film]
After all the roles were casted, location scouting began. Four mental institutions were visited before the filmmakers arrived at Oregon State Hospital, which was the only mental institution that had read the book. Filming in an actual mental institution rather than an in easy Hollywood studio turned out to be one of the best decisions the filmmakers made. It created an environment and an isolation that a Hollywood studio could not match. There was a week of rehearsal before the cameras started rolling. The actors spent half of the day rehearsing big scenes and the other half in their ward just staying in character. The actors actually lived in the ward while the filming was taken place. They had their own cell and bed in the ward that they fixed up how they wanted. “Someone who came in there might have had a hard time distinguishing between who where the actors and who were the actual mental patients.” (Christopher Lloyd) The actors even went to group therapy sessions with real patients. [Telegraph News Article]
When the filming...

Other Essays Like One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest Book to Movie

The Movie "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest Is Analyzed Using Psychoanalytic, Reader-Response, Feminist, And Marxist Criticism

3806 words - 16 pages Falling into Theory - One Flew Over the CuckOo's Nest (Question #2)Psychoanalytic ApproachTextual PassageNurse Pilbo: Take your medicine, Mr. McMurphyMcMurphy: What's in the horse pill?Nurse Pilbo: It's good for you. Don't get angry, Mr. McMurphyMcMurphy: I'm not getting angry, Nurse Pilbo. I just don't like taking anything when I don't know what it is. I don't want anyone slippin' me saltpeter, if you know what I mean.Nurse Ratched: That's okay

A Comparison of Hamlet and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

2941 words - 12 pages find, takes little consideration of the times in which we live.  Indeed, most modern plays and literature are not about monarchs and the main character is often equal to the common person; this, however, does not mean the plot is any less miserable nor the outcome any less wretched.  The first work I have chosen proves this fact.  One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, a first novel by Ken Kesey published in 1962, is a

Theme Of Control In "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest" And "Brave New World"

1987 words - 8 pages people do not rebel because they do not even have the notion of rebelling. Their lives are so programmed they can barely even think for themselves and the Savage’s attempts to deprogram them are doomed to failure. McMurphy was fighting an uphill battle, but the Savage was going up against a sheer cliff. Works Cited Kesey, Ken. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. New York: Penguin Books, 2003. Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins Publisher.

One Flew over the Cuckoos Nest

1770 words - 8 pages Cynthia K. Nessmith Professor Shawana Stanford American Literature 2130 14 April 2013 Film adaptation of the American novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest novel was written by Ken Kesey in 1962. The film adaptation version was directed by Czech Milos Forman in 1975. My goal in this paper is not only to compare the film adaptation to the Novel but to also explain what I think the symbols represent, critic’s

One Flew over the Cuckoos Nest

4025 words - 17 pages One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey Study Guide Note: There are no numbered chapters in this book, but each of the four parts is broken down into scenes. For clarity in this Unit, the first few words of each scene are used as the heading. ✪ PART 1 They’re out there. 1. Why do the black hospital workers not “…bother not talking out loud about their hate secrets when.” the Chief is around? (Pg. 10) In what ways does

One Flew over the Cuckoos Nest

1268 words - 6 pages 1.At first it seems very hard to define McMurphy`s person. In the beginning he is a gambling fool who is only thinking about himself, later in the book my opinion on McMurphy changes alot, he begins to think about the other patients and help them to gain more self confidence. Nurse Ratched is on the other hand a control freak, she is portrayed more as a machine than a human being, Nurse Ratched has all the control on the institution and she

The Quote "If You Want To Make Enemies Try To Change Something" By Woodrow Wilson Is Applied In "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest". Discuss

992 words - 4 pages The quote “If you want to make enemies try to change something” by Woodrow Wilson is applied in Ken Kesey’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”. Kesey allows the responder to view the enemies that McMurphy makes in his attempt to change the way the institution is run and the way the other patients are treated. His heroic attempt does have consequences however which is demonstrated throughout the novel.Prior to the

To What Extent Does The Writer Present The Individual As Powerless In The Face Of Society In "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest"?

1615 words - 7 pages Ken Kesey, the author of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest", portrays a lot of powerless people in the face of society in his novel. I will be writing about on a couple, but mainly focusing on William (Billy) Bibbit.Who was Billy Bibbit? Billy was thirty-one year old man, who was psychologically an adolescent. Ken Kesey, demonstrates Billy's powerlessness, in a couple of places in the text, which will explain the major things that lead to Billy

One Flew over Cuckoos Nest

596 words - 3 pages Post-traumatic stress disorder or also known as PTSD is a disease where if someone has seen or experienced a traumatic event it can scar them for life. This disease occurs in the book One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey because the book takes place in a mental hospital which contains people with this disorder and others. The main character McMurphy puts them through more traumatic events throughout the book which shows who can handle

Amy of Beloved and Rp of One Flew vs. the Cuckoo’s Nest

2033 words - 9 pages Comparing Amy of Beloved and RP of One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest The gentlemen in “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest” were in search of mental freedom. Fear kept them prisoners of their own minds. Perhaps the main focus of the film was to illustrate the point that we are master’s of own freedom. However, it is difficult to change our pattern of thinking. Sometimes, in fact, we need someone to show us just how it is done. Ken Kesey's

To Kill a Mockingbird Book vs Movie

1236 words - 5 pages did convey the theme of perspective. The last scene of the book was one of the most powerful scenes in the book that conveyed the theme, the porch scene where Scout is standing on Boo’s porch. This scene is in the movie but in my opinion I do not believe that it conveyed the mood as well as in the book. In the book To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper Lee did a great job on conveying the mood of perspective. One scene that she did a great job on

Related Papers

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

1258 words - 6 pages institutions is also portrayed through many.Kesey seems to follow a fairly straightforward course in unfolding the plot of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Except for a few flashbacks and digressions, the story is essentially told from beginning to end. The first-person ("I") narrator Chief Bromden, however, is a schizophrenic - a person prone to hallucinations and delusions. As a result, the reader is sometimes unsure whether some of the events

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest: 3 Points

1053 words - 5 pages In Ken Kesey's One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest, the author refers to the many struggles people individually face in life. Through the conflict between Nurse Ratched and McMurphy, the novel explores the themes of individuality and rebellion against conformity. With these themes, Kesey makes various points which help us understand which situations of repression can lead an individual to insanity. These points include: the effects of sexual

Summary And Analysis Of One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

4315 words - 18 pages Summary and Analysis of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest 1.1     Presentation of the theme and my motive to choose it I chose the subject about “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest” written by Ken Kesey in 1962 for my research paper because my mother told me years ago of the accompanying film and how interesting it is. Two years ago a friend of mine came back from his exchange programme in the United States of America. He told me that he and his

Misuse Of Powe In One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

1833 words - 8 pages In the cinematic classic, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest expresses the ideal that the inhibitory rights of freedom, sly manipulation, and misuse of power results in an oppressive authoritarian leader that misuses his/her own power in handling people. The setting is placed in between the 1950’s and 1960’s in an insane asylum. The film challenges the view of what exactly determines someone to be “insane” or “sane” the main character sheds light