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Personal Objective Narrative Description Essay

952 words - 4 pages

Name: Brooke Edwards

Personal Object Narrative Description

Objectives:
By completing this assignment you will:
• write a narrative that examines the personal significance of an object
• use sensory details to describe an object of personal value
• connect explicitly the narrative to the object’s worth—tell us Why Do We Care
• demonstrate an understanding of the different types of values

A personal description examines a subject that the writer find meaningful. That subject should be a valuable object that is small enough to be held in your arms and not be alive (no cars, no pets). Write a personal description is like making a multi-sensory film. Begin by ...view middle of the document...

TOPICS TO CONSIDER: Think about a special gift, a tool you use, a cherished object that has been damaged in some way. Do you have a journal you have kept since you were six? Do you have the hat your grandfather wore when he returned from WWII? Do you have a special bouqet of flowers from your grandmothers funeral? Whatever object you choose, it should represent something greater than just itself. Also, it should not be something where an easy substitute can be found. For instance, you can’t write about a hockey stick because you like to play hockey. You can, however, write about the stick you used when your team won the state championship. Don’t write about a piano because you like to play, but if you have played the same piano since you were four—then you are set.

FINAL THOUGHTS:
Be curious. Set out to learn more about your object than you know now. Review easy-to-recall memories, but then dig out those details that lie hidden like your baby pictures.
Be bold. Describe what you see—blemishes and all. Help the reader smell both the roses and the rubbish. Create a dominant and powerful impression—as strong sense of the subject’s essential nature, overall values, and personal meaning to you.
Be precise. Reading a description that uses almost as disappointing as socks for Christmas Choose strong nouns, verbs, and modifiers that focus details for the reader.

Look over the attached rubric for ideas how this project will be graded. As always, come see me should any questions arise while in the writing process. Good luck.

Name: Brooke Edwards

Objectives:
By completing this assignment students will:
• learn the importance and power of effective word choice
• differentiate between strong and weak nouns, adjectives, and verbs
• model strong word choice with descriptions
• improve the nouns, adjective, and verbs in their...

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