This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

"The Awakening" By Kate Chopin Essay

1060 words - 5 pages

In The Awakening, Kate Chopin used the sea as a symbol to show how Edna awakened to her independence, her sexual desires and her place in society. The book took place in the late 1800s on Grand Isle in Louisiana. The main character Edna Pontellier, who was not a Creole, was married to Leonce Pontellier, who was a Creole. Leonce was self-centered and did not care about anybody but himself. He saw Edna as his possession because in Creole society men were dominant. Seldom did the Creoles accept outsiders into their social circle and women were expected to provide well-kept homes and have many children. Edna did not feel that she fit into the Creole society and finally awoke to many feelings ...view middle of the document...

I am not going to be forced into doing anything. I don't want to go abroad. I want to be let alone. Nobody has any right-except perhaps-and even then, it seems to me-or it did seem" (184). This quote indicates that Edna no longer wants to be told what to do. The pigeon house helped her come to this conclusion because there she was free to do as she pleased. While Edna gained independence from the sea she also gained her sexual desire.Edna's awakening to her sexual desire evolved after the first time she swam in the sea. Edna did not see herself as an individual with desires and opinions of her own while being with Leonce. He did not regard Edna as a partner in marriage, but rather as a possession. At the same time, he thought of Edna as the "sole object of his existence." Edna did not want to be seen this way because she did not want to be a possession. She had no feelings for him; "her marriage to Leonce was purely an accident, in this respect resembling many other marriages which masquerade as the decrees of Fate" (32). Throughout the six years of marriage to Leonce there was passion burning inside of Edna that could not be expressed. When Alcee Arobin came along while Robert was gone in Mexico, Edna felt the passion that had been burning inside. As Alcee kissed Edna it awakened her "sensuous sensibilities" and she could not resist but to kiss him back. She cried after Alcee left because she experienced conflicting emotions. She did not feel ashamed or remorseful but she regretted that the kiss was not motivated by love. Edna then goes further with Alcee because "he did not answer, except to continue to caress her. He did not say good night until she had become supple to his gentle, seductive entreaties"...

Other Essays Like "The Awakening" By Kate Chopin

Freedom Iin Kate Chopin's The Awakening

810 words - 4 pages Finding Freedom in The Awakening In her novel, The Awakening, Kate Chopin shows Edna Pontellier¹s confrontations with society, her imprisonment in marriage and Edna¹s exploration of her own sexuality. Chopin also portrays Edna as a rebel, who after her experiences at Grand Isle wants to live a full and a free life and not to follow the rules of society. Edna¹s life ends in her suicide, but her death does not come as a surprise. Chopin

Kate Chopin's The Awakening: Women's Role In Society

1577 words - 7 pages suicide, leaving her life and family behind. Mrs. Pontellier's character and how she ended her life is what caused the novel to receive negative criticism and caused a main controversy. In The Awakening, Kate Chopin portrays women as being loving wives and mothers that live their life to care for their family and worship their husbands. According to literary critic, Dana Kinninson, this story indicates two types of women, which are expressed by

Comparison of main female characters(Jane, Edna Pontellier, and Louise Mallard) from the novels written by , The Awakening, The Yellow Wallpaper and The Story of an Hour

414 words - 2 pages The narrator (Jane) of The Yellow Wallpaper and the character Edna Pontellier from The Awakening and Louise Mallard of The Story of an Hour are equally trapped within the boundaries of male domination. These boundaries come from their husbands, whom will not allow them to right to express themselves as individuals. They are to be "the wives" and nothing more. Not content with the situation, these women try to break away from the stereotype.Edna

Kate Chopin Gives A Womans Voice To Realism

1206 words - 5 pages life, but no one wanted to admit it. She was writing what she felt, and she wanted to give a woman's voice to realism. The Critics and Critism After she published her novel The Awakening, many people banned it and refused to read it. It was dismissed as "gilded dirt". (234) The were shocked and appalled by what Kate Chopin had written. They didn't think that a woman should be talking and writing about such things. (Wilson 184

Feminism In "The Awakening"

1091 words - 5 pages In the novel The Awakening, by Kate Chopin the critical approach feminism is a major aspect of the novel. According to dictionary.reference.com the word feminism means, “The doctrine advocating social, political, and all other rights of women equal to those of men.” The Awakening takes place during the late eighteen hundreds to early nineteen hundreds, in New Orleans. The novel is about Edna Pontellier and her family on a summer vacation. Edna

The Awakening Symbolism

1644 words - 7 pages A Journey for the Lost Soul The Awakening by Kate Chopin was written during the 1800’s and was published in the year of 1899. During this time, the novel struck controversial subjects using a strong feminist tone, which underlined Chopin’s views on sex, marriage, and women of that period. In this novel, it is evident that freedom and feminism are used as interrelations of each other to express her feelings towards each subject. Some characters

Feminist Criticism In The Story Of An Hour

571 words - 3 pages oppression and by giving the protagonist "bad girl" qualities. It has also been show how the author's environment has influenced her to unconsciously create a female character based on the ideology she is trying to undermine. It can be concluded that Chopin story undermines but also unconsciously reinforces patriarchal ideology.Works citedChopin, Kate. "The Story of an Hour." The Awakening and Other Stories. New York: Holt,Rinehart and Winston, 1970. Print.Tyson, Lois. "Feminist Criticism." Critical Theory Today: A Users Friendly Guide.New York/London: Garland, 1999. Print.

Free at Last

1230 words - 5 pages their own rules from within their hearts. Such determination and steadfastness comes from a strong and courageous human being. Who knew these individuals were woman? These attributes are displayed in two of literature’s most famous and inspiring women, Kate Chopin and Emily Dickinson. Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening and Emily Dickinson’s poem “The Soul Selects her own Society” compare on the theme of independence as demonstrated by the

"The Awakening" Symbolism, Irony, and Figurative Language

987 words - 4 pages Chopin, Kate. “The Awakening.” COPYRIGHT, 1899 , BY HERBERT S. STONE & CO.Print. “Irony.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, 2014. Web. 8 April. 2014. "Symbolism." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, 2014. Web. 8 April. 2014.

The Awakening

518 words - 3 pages that point in the novel. Even from the beginning of the text though, it is clear that she is not always the most responsible mother. She lets her children wander off with the nanny and does not always heed the signs when they are ill. As the narrator states in one of the important quotes from “The Awakening” by Kate Chopin,“She was fond of her children in an uneven, impulsive way. She would sometimes gather them passionately to her heart and

Dealing With Society Edna Pontelliers Battle With Social Class

1991 words - 8 pages Dealing with Society Edna Pontelliers Battle with Social Class Edna Pontellier, the main character in Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening, is a woman trying to form her own identity, both feminine and sexually, in the repressive and Victorian Creole world of the latter nineteenth century. She is met by a counterpart, Mademoiselle Reisz, who is able to live freely as a woman. Edna herself was denied this freedom because of the respectable

Related Papers

Literary Analysis The Awakening By Kate Chopin

948 words - 4 pages , and husband-worshipping lady. The Creole society had set-beliefs about how a woman should conduct herself. In The Awakening by Kate Chopin, Edna Pontellier, a non-native of the Creole community is depicted, as not embodying the ideal Creole woman, even though others expect her to since is married to Leonce Pontellier, a Creole native . In the course of this novel, Edna meets various friends and foes that help her find herself. Some of these

Kate Chopins The Awakening Essay

993 words - 4 pages Kate Chopin's The Awakening In the story about Edna Pontellier a major theme is her omitted self discovery. In the story we can see how Chopin uses style, tone and content to make the reader understand how it was for a person challenging many of the beliefs of the society at the beginning of the twentieth century. I believe there are many points in the story that can be considered to be very relevant to the time it was written, expressing

Desiree's Baby By Kate Chopin Essay

1823 words - 8 pages short story "Desiree's Baby" by Kate Chopin portrays two main characters in the patriarchal society in the 19th century. First Chopin evinces the naïve, guileless, and ingenuous women, who did not have a voice of their own. Secondly, the overpowering husband, who killed the women mentally leading to a painful life and death. Desiree is the quintessential 19th century woman, has abandonment fears due to her oral stage, a sense of emptiness

Freedom And Symbolism In "The Story Of An Hour" By Kate Chopin

669 words - 3 pages "The Story of an Hour" by Kate ChopinIn "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin, the author tells a short story of harsh irony and a wife's realization of a new life after her husband's death. Chopin introduces the main character, Louise Mallard, as a married woman with a weak heart and a marriage that is complicated and restrictive. In the beginning of the story Louise hears the news of her husband's death in a train accident. She is distraught