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The Theology Of The Emerging Church

3517 words - 15 pages

RESEARCH PAPER

“The Theology of the Emerging Church”

THEO 510 LUO
Dr. Sanders

Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary

Joseph M. Yarbrough

November 10, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………1
History of the Church……………….……………………………………………………………2
Church Doctrine…………………………………………………………………………………..3
The Emerging Church…………………………………………………………………………….4
Beliefs of the Emerging Church…………………………………………………………………..5
Methodologies of the Emerging Church………………………………………………………….8
Strengths and Weakness of the Emerging Church………………………………………………..9
Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………….10
Works Cited……………………………………………………………………………………...12

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Clearly the church needs to emerge from its negative past into a new direction that provides clarity to a generation that is seeking truth. However, according to Daniel Akin, as long as quick numerical growth remains the primary indicator of church health, the truth will be compromised.” There is one part of the Christian church that is seeking to adapt to today’s culture, and that is the Emerging Church. What is the emerging church all about? What do they believe? This research paper will seek to answer those questions and more. The theology of the emerging church is exclusively inclusive in its acceptance of church doctrine, methodologies, and theology. By definition, it is ever changing and evolving in its quest for experiencing all of who God is.
History of the Church
Has the Christian church always been emerging or has it mainly stayed the same? The roots of the Christian church can be traced back into Jewish history long before the birth of Jesus Christ. It was Jesus, however, who criticized traditional Judaism and brought a regeneration crusade into history’s light early in the first century. The teachings of Jesus spread throughout the Mediterranean area after his crucifixion. We know from history that the Apostle Paul was especially influential in the spreading of Christianity. Paul was a leader in Christianity’s emergence from Palestinian Judaism to a position as a universal religion through his proclamation of God’s gift of salvation for all men.” After two-thousand years, Christianity is supposedly the faith of one-third of the earth’s population. Jesus Christ used a handful of fishermen, tax collectors, and young menaces in Judea, to start the spread of Christianity which has now claimed the devotion many people all across planet Earth.”
Marc Driscoll describes the emergence of the church from its origins to its place today in America, “The church started as a missionary movement in Jerusalem. It moved to Rome and became an institution. It traveled to Europe and became a culture. It crossed the Atlantic to America and became a big business. For two thousand years, the Christian story has been told in every paradigm of history and in every culture and geographical area penetrated by the Christian gospel. While the Christian faith has a fixe framework of creation, fall, incarnation, death, resurrection, church, and new heaven and new earth, this framework and the story of God it reveals is always contextualized into this or that culture. The faith engaged with Platonism in the ancient world, with Aristotle in the medieval world, with nominalism in the Reformation era, and with rationalism in the modern world. Now the church must engage with the emergence of a postmodern, post-Christian, neo-pagan world.”
Church Doctrine
Daniel Akin describes the church as, “the body of people called by God’s grace through faith in Christ to glorify him together by serving him in his world.”The doctrine of the church is a crucial component of...

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