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Understanding Adult Adhd Essay

2149 words - 9 pages

UNDERSTANDING ADULT ADHD
ALENE CAMP
UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY

Orisade Awodola, M.A., Ph.D

06/04/2013

UNDERSTANDING ADULT ADHD

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABSTRACT…………………………………………………………….…………………………3

DEFINITION OF ADHD…………………………………………………………………………4

SYMPTOMS AND DIAGNOSIS OF ADULT ADHD………………….………………………4

TREATMENT OF ADULT ADHD………………………………………………………………7

RECENT CHANGES AS DEFINED IN DSM V…………………………………….………….7

SUMMARY……………………………………………………………………………………….9

REFERENCES……………………..……………………………………………………………11

ABSTRACT

Childhood ADHD receives a lot of media attention. From opinions of faulty diagnoses to general disagreements regarding ...view middle of the document...

” While it has been proven through research that ADHD often progresses into adulthood even with strict adherence to prescribed treatment, there remains a void in published data on the overall effect of ADHD on the adult.
Symptoms and Diagnosis
The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) is a standard manual used and accepted by mental health professionals to help diagnose ADHD. This diagnostic standard helps ensure that people are appropriately diagnosed and treated for ADHD. Using the same standard across communities greatly increases the chance of a universal approach to diagnoses and treatment of ADHD.
According to the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000), a person has ADHD if Either A or B are true:
A. Six or more of the following symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months to a point that is inappropriate for developmental level:
Inattention
Often does not give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities.

Often has trouble keeping attention on tasks or play activities.
Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions).

Often has trouble organizing activities.
Often avoids, dislikes, or doesn't want to do things that take a lot of mental effort for a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).
Often loses things needed for tasks and activities (e.g. toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools).

Is often easily distracted.
Is often forgetful in daily activities.
B. Six or more of the following symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have been present for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:

Hyperactivity
Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat when sitting still is expected.
Often gets up from seat when remaining in seat is expected.
Often excessively runs about or climbs when and where it is not appropriate (adolescents or adults may feel very restless).

Often has trouble playing or doing leisure activities quietly.
Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor".
Often talks excessively.
Impulsivity
Often blurts out answers before questions have been finished.
Often has trouble waiting one's turn.
Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games).
II. Some symptoms that cause impairment were present before age 7 years.
III. Some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g. at school/work and at home).

IV. There must be clear evidence of clinically significant impairment in social, school, or work functioning.
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