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Virginia Woolf Essay

850 words - 4 pages

Vicky Vazquez
December 1, 2008
4th period

Virginia Woolf Analysis Essay

Some say that we do not know the true value of our moments until they have undergone the test of memory. In her memoirs, Virginia Woolf dwells upon treasured memories of a fishing day in her childhood, in the company of her father and brother, who enjoyed fishing. Instead of a memory lingering at the back of her mind, it becomes one that she vividly contemplates, remembering every word, every detail. Using figurative language, concrete diction, and telegraphic sentences, Woolf effectively conveys the lasting significance of these moments from her past: she remembers how her father first ...view middle of the document...

Through the use of verbiage such as, “inch” or “two” she gives a thorough description of the movements of the fish while she struggles to catch it, showing how significant this moment of catching the fish meant for her since she remembered every aspect of it, even the smallest details.
As the closure of her essay approaches, the second paragraph devotes itself to the “perfect lesson” that Woolf learned, which led to her metamorphosis. This paragraph of paramount importance encompasses the main idea of the entire piece. The structure and movements of the paragraphs evinces how Woolf's experience began as simple events but gained significance later. Woolf accurately quotes her father's words in lines 23-25 despite the fact that her father said them in a distant past, “Next time if you are going to fish I shan’t come; I don’t like to see fish caught but you can go if you like.” That exact dialogue demonstrates that she does not talk about just any memory; she has the ability to recreate her father’s distinct words which captures the significance of her memory of fishing with her father. In line 25, Woolf uses a telegraphic sentence, “It was a perfect lesson,” emphasizing the importance the moment of fishing with her father had for her, she began making her own decisions. She later expresses in lines 28-31 the "acute passion" that she felt toward fishing and how her father's words "slowly extinguished it…leaving no grudge, I ceased to wish to catch...

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