Marxism Essay Examples

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Marxism Theory Essay

939 words - 4 pages Explain the Marxism theory (P1) Marxism is one of the theories that provide an understanding of how the organisation works and emphasises the structure of the society. The Marxism theory suggests how and why societies develop and change to become a stronger society as a whole. This perspective is a contradictory theory of the functionalist perspective the focuses on the conflict, class, division, power and ideology. This theory emphasises that individuals allow themselves to be exploited by their employers and is a scrutinizing system where ideas are based on the change of social changes in terms of economic factors. In order to further understand the theory of Marxism and how it VIEW DOCUMENT
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Social Hierarchy in Marxism Essay

1242 words - 5 pages What is the relevance of the term “social hierarchy” to the Marxist theory of thought? I will explore this question using a definition of social hierarchy which states that it is a stratification of prestige and power. In Marxist theory of thought, who has power is defined by who owns the means of the production, meaning the resources, technology and human labour. Although there are many different types of social hierarchies, depending on what kind of power you are looking at (cultural, religious etc), Marxism defines power by economy, and so this is the form of social hierarchy which I will be working with in relation to Marxism. Since Marx evaluated power according to economic VIEW DOCUMENT
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Marxism Within Blt Essay

5258 words - 22 pages Marxism Within Black Theology of Liberation. This study seeks to expose the ways in which Black Theology of Liberation was shaped by Marxism through the writings of its founders, concentrating predominantly on the need to bring about the liberation of the poor African-Americans from their repressive white racist oppressors by any means necessary, and the redistribution of wealth to those deprived of it by their white capitalist oppressors. The theme of this researched remained embed in my mind during, and after the 2008-09 presidential campaign of former Sen. Barack Obama, when some of his political opponents thought it beneficial to disclose Obama’s connections to a Black Theology VIEW DOCUMENT
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Assess the Contribution of Marxism Essay

832 words - 4 pages Sociology essay Intro Assess the contribution of Marxism to our understanding of families and household. Marxism is the political and economic theory formed by Karl Marx and Freidrich Engels. “Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people.” – Karl Marx He is trying to say religion is the drug of people. It’s what keeps them alive in these wretched times. The oppressed creatures are the lower classed people forced to work every day just to feed their families. The heartless world are the capitalist, the selfish rich people who have never labored a day in their life. The soulless VIEW DOCUMENT
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Che Guevara And A New Paradigm Of Marxism This Paper Is Regarding Che Guevara's Separate Brand Of Marxism, Ie: How He Adpated Marxism To Work In The Cuban Jungles

3028 words - 13 pages Marxism resulted in a form of Marxist revolution differing from classical Marxism in three substantial ways. Firstly, Marx's view of the world was purely objectional, a scientific theory with an unvested interest in the proposed outcome. Contrast this to Guevara, a humanitarian doctor, who upon touring South America and seeing the plight of inequality in his country, vowed to change it. Furthermore, they differed in method as well. Marx believed that the revolution would start in the cities as a product of the proletariat. Guevara however, was intent on using the farmers and displaced peasants to start a guerilla uprising in the countryside. Both of these points coincide with the final argument VIEW DOCUMENT
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An Examination of the Communist Revolution of China as a Representation of Marxism and Maoism

4245 words - 17 pages "A specter is haunting Europe - the specter of communism." To many, Communism and Marxism are interchangeable, despite the differences between the two. Communal societies have existed long before the Industrial Revolution, while Marxism was only created during the mid-nineteenth century after the publication of The Communist Manifesto. Marxism goes beyond just the notion of a communal society, it’s philosophy is also a method of studying history and economy. Marxist theory also predicts that the proletariat will eventually seize control of the means of production. The theory behind Marxism is so in-depth that a nation could be under communist rule without necessarily following the Marxist VIEW DOCUMENT
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Marxism in Pride and Prejudice Essay

715 words - 3 pages MEG-I ,2,3 & 4 MASTER'S DEGREE IN ENGLISH (MEG) ASSIGNMENTS 2012-2013 July, 2012 and January 2013 Sessions (Compulsory Courses of M.A. English British Poetry-01 British Drama-O2 British Novel-03 Aspects of Language-O4 - lst Year) lw l$ffifl$ffiffi t&B &ffiffin irjtlifv[R5tw lTi'*rPsff$'$ School of Humanities Indira Gandhi National Open University Maidan Garhi, New Delhi-11006 Mastex'os Segree in &nglish Ass$g*xeeents flcr t'u yean Ccxngrulsary Courses Course Code:*{EC .Dear Student, 'l'his booklet contai*s all the assignments namell,': d the Compulsory ilourses of MA {linglish) i" year il ffi H h,ItrG-0i ME{i-02 M[,c-03 ivlEc VIEW DOCUMENT
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Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess the Contribution of Marxism to Our Understanding of the Role of Education

1545 words - 7 pages pointed to the existence of a hidden curriculum in schools. Using material from Item A and elsewhere, assess the contribution of Marxism to our understanding of the role of education. (20 marks) Marx believed that the ruling class do not just own the means of production but they also rule as thinkers and producers of ideas. From a young age the ruling class were taught that you should rule by ideas, which is more powerful than ruling by force. This is because some people become angry when they say no. In education you are taught certain norms and values. For example attendance, punctuality, obedience, respect – hand up in class before speaking. If the pupils do not conform to these rules VIEW DOCUMENT
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Why was there a revolution in Russia in 1905?

374 words - 2 pages The Russian Revolution of 1905 was both anti-government and undirected violence against its Tsar. It was not controlled or managed. The causes were simple, freedom/democracy, food/jobs, which were led by the Socialist Revolutionary party and the workers, influenced by Marxism, were represented in the Bolshevik and Menshevik wings of the Social Democratic Labor party.The revolution was the culmination of a long period of repression and unrest. Since Peter the Great, the Tsars increasingly became autocratic bureaucracy tyrants. Russian people did not have much freedom and democracy; the Tsars imposed its will on the people by force, with disregard for human life and liberty. A group of VIEW DOCUMENT
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P1- Explain the Principle Sociological Perspectives

1234 words - 5 pages for the expression of sexuality in an approved context. The reproductive function provided stability for the rearing of children, also socialisation which includes the responsibility of teaching children the accepted ways of behaving in society. He also suggests that the economic function meant that food, shelter and financial security had to be provided by the head of the family for rest of the members. Marxism Marxism is a structuralise theory which considers that society is based on conflicts of interests and stresses the importance of the role of conflict. Critics’ state that this theory gives little freedom to individuals as the emphasis is on conflict; however, not every society VIEW DOCUMENT
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Marxist's View

768 words - 4 pages Critically examine Marxist views of today's society. (33m) The Marxist perspective is based on the works of Karl Marx and argues that society is divided into two classes; the Ruling classes (RC), and the working class (WC). According to Marxism, the RC exploits the WC by making them work longer hours with little rewards, whilst they receive all the benefits and this is what Marx referred to as capitalism. In this capitalist society, the working class experiences a false class consciousness; this is where they are not aware of the fact that they are being exploited by the ruling class. Marx claimed that the only way to resolve this conflict between the two classes is by evolving from a VIEW DOCUMENT
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Challenges to Ir

1352 words - 6 pages “Capitalism so colours our lives that most people see the behaviour that occurs within it as a product of some universal human nature” (Marx, 1848). Although this statement originated over one hundred and fifty years ago, you can still observe its relevance in today’s society. With reference to the titled question, this essay aims to explore the many ways in which traditional Marxist writings have influenced many contemporary perspectives. I will initially look to elaborate on structuralism, one school of thought which is directly linked to Marxism and also critical theory which draws upon the work of Antonio Gramsci. To begin with, structuralism is heavily inspired by Marxist VIEW DOCUMENT
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Social Differences in Lord of the Flies

4273 words - 18 pages , education and income. Although different social classes are inevitable in the society and they play an important role but at the same time there are some drawbacks as well. The upper class having power use their power in wrong way in the society thus creating disorder and harmful effect. This inequality brings a state of war among the people who cross their limits to which a society bounds them, thus causing destruction. Marxism is a political and economical theory proposed by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels which is about the class differences in the society and struggle of a certain class to end up its oppression which favors a classless society VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Marxist Model of Class Structure and Conflict with Reference to the Caribbean

766 words - 4 pages institutions (religion, government etc) or the superstructure of the society according to Marx. On the other hand, there is also a coalition of interests between large land owners, financiers and manufacturers. These individuals are wealthy because they own the means of production. Through this, they can exploit the working class. In this way, there is alienation of the working class as they are a class for themselves. Finally, there is increasing class conflict where the lower class has to fight for their rights. This is evidenced by increasing trade union membership and activities such as strikes, social unrest and interclass conflict. Although Marxism can to some extent explain class VIEW DOCUMENT
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Communism vs Socialism

670 words - 3 pages Communism fail to meet the needs of the people. This shows the breakdown between their ideas and their actual accomplishments. The inevitability of these two systems failing was great. History showed another tale. The rise of Communism in China is largely due to a man named Mao Zedong. He was the leader who took over in the time of chaos. These times of chaos and despair played a large role in acceptance of Mao’s teachings. He had the support of roughly 85 percent of the nation. Mao started a society to study Marxism, and quickly converted to a communist party. He led the communist party in a battle against nationalists and won solidifying communism in China to this day. Like China, the USSR VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Rise and Fall of Equality

1038 words - 5 pages their names (they do keep accentuating with Marxism, Maoism, Leninism, Stalinism, etc.), they can never do away with the fact that they are truly tormented by the ghost of a decadent past. Some loyalists might say the primal values of communism are still intact within these parties. Sadly, they are mistaken. When you acquiesce to one ideology, you must shun its opposite. Communism calls for a classless society, a society with no personal wealth, and it is due to the very lack of allegiance to this doctrine by today’s parties that they cannot be called communist. Communism, unlike widely believed, was not the practical implementation of Marxism. Marxism was at its core an economic theory, a VIEW DOCUMENT
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Anna Karenina and A Doll's House: Feminist and Marxist Critisism

874 words - 4 pages Introduction At the time Anna Karenina and A Doll’s House were written, both published around the 1870s, Russian women were primarily under the control of their fathers and husbands. For this very reason, marriage was, in a way, a career goal for Russian women at that time. This feeds into the marxist theme because every character in each novel is In both Anna Karenina and A Doll’s House, the problems Anna and Nora face from the marxist perspectives of the time are heavily compounded by their gender. Anna Karenina and Feminism In that sense Anna had her life set. She was married with a child to a wealthy man of high social standing Anna Karenina and Marxism A Doll’s House VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Enlightment

834 words - 4 pages . In the 1900 Enlightenment expanded through modern science. Again religious beliefs were tested and “Enlightened” scientist pushed theories of evolution. As stated in the question Marxism-Leninism theories in regards to Enlightenment is open to interpretation. My belief is that Karl Marx who saw himself as a scientist pushed to formulate general laws that would explain events in a rational way. He didn’t believe in heavenly intervention, chances or the divinely endowed powers of Kings. (749). Marx believed that religion perpetuated classes of social systems and wanted to end it. I believe Marx theories were borderline atheist however he didn’t believe he was. He just rejected the beliefs of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Unit 11 P1

1790 words - 8 pages P1: explain the principal sociological perspectives. In sociology there are six main principal perspectives and these are Functionalism, Marxism, Feminism, Interactionism, Postmodernism, Collectivism and New Right. Functionalism In 1951, Talcott Parsons introduced the Functionalist view and this studies the social structure as a whole of how it functions as well as how each social structure is crucial in the interests of society. Functionalism believes that humans and the society have basic needs, institutions and governments might be responsible to meet the required needs of people also the functionalist may consider that they are different kinds of sources that could limit the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Crime and Deviance

2697 words - 11 pages individual in society. It explains how crime and deviance is necessary for society to move on and not stagnate because without crime society would not exist it pushes social, legal and moral boundaries to form the next step of normality. Functionalism however is based on the idea that society is a “Value Consensus” society which would mean that if it worked there would be no crimes. It is also a very middle class theory, which does not look at power relationships between the rich and the poor which is to the opposite end of the scale from the Marxist theory. Where Functionalism is a consensus theory, Marxism is a conflict theory which believes that there is a basic conflict of interest VIEW DOCUMENT
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Hindusm World View

2415 words - 10 pages Nations Maintain international peace and security; develop friendly relations among nations; achieve international cooperation in solving international problems; and function as a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations. North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) purpose was military alliance and a system of collective defence where its member states agree to mutual defence in response to an attack by any external party (Thomson, 1995:213-233). Critical/ Transformative Marxist challenge to international relations as a challenge of the problematique of international relation to Marxism that reaches back into the very core premises of its founders. According to Scott, Andrew, and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Utopia For The Twentieth Century

4993 words - 20 pages --- which have never before been witnessed by humanity. If Marxism is to continue to hold promise for our effort to liberate ourselves from undesirable social conditions, there is a need to adapt it so that it may address the peculiarities of the twentieth century, those which Marx himself could not have seen. Additionally, the humanist and utopian ideals of Marx and Engels, such as freedom from bondage as well as social harmony, ought to be preserved and promoted. The contributions of twentieth-century Marxists are invaluable to us for this reason. Through these philosophers, the insistent utopianism of Marxism may be preserved, while the analyses and prescriptions become updated and made VIEW DOCUMENT
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Beginng of the Great Revival

3965 words - 16 pages Beginng of the Great Revival : the foundation of the CCP: how it was founded and in what circumstances? What did the Russia play the role in building the CCP. The Chinese Communist Party (CCP, or Zhongguo gongchandang) was founded July 1, 1921, in Shanghai, and started with fifty-seven members. Eighty years later, in 2002, the CCP was the largest national Communist organization in existence, with over sixty-six million members. The CCP has governed the People’s Republic of China from the republic’s founding in 1949 until today. Marxism was introduced to China by young intellectuals active in the nationalist movement, which reached its culmination in the demonstrations of May VIEW DOCUMENT
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To Live In A Vermin’S World: A Marxist View Of Kafka’S The Metamorphosis

2135 words - 9 pages To Live in a Vermin’s World: A Marxist View of Kafka’s The Metamorphosis One of the honors for ‘greatest theories’ in contemporary civilization has to be awarded to Marxism. Invented in late 19th century by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, Marxism has had great influences on the development of modern society. Despite its eventual failure, Marxism once led to numerous revolutions that working classes raised against the ruling parties in different countries. Consequently, it paved the way for the erection of the Berlin Wall, the formation of the Warsaw Treaties—communist camp confronting NATO, and the establishment of a world super power, the Soviet Union at the dawn of this century. Even VIEW DOCUMENT
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Introduction to Sociological Perspectives

1985 words - 8 pages The Sociological Perspective Introduction The sociological perspective is defined by three philosophical traditions (or "paradigms"): structure-functionalism, Marxism, and symbolic interactionism. Structure-functionalism focuses on how society is organized and how social institutions meet the needs of people living within a collectivity. The Marxian paradigm guides inquiries into the use and misuse of power within and across social systems. Symbolic interactionism focuses on how individuals influence and are influenced by society. It guides investigations into how the rules of society are re-created everyday through our interactions with one another. The following introduction to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Karl Marx

1047 words - 5 pages writings, which made his ideas constantly develop. Marx truly believed that he could study society scientifically which was revolutionary at the time. It is what caused him to be thought of as one of the founders of sociology. He also believed he could predict social conflicts by looking back at history (Korsch 1963.) Karl Marx had such an influence on sociology that his views are recognized worldwide. People often refer to his views as “Marxism”. Marxism includes his social views, but also his economic views. All over the world there are slightly different views of Karl Marx and “Marxism”. Regardless of whether you view Karl Marx as a good man or a bad man, there is no doubt he had a VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Nuclear Family

1209 words - 5 pages the family is not dissimilar to that of the feminist as they also believe it is stressed on the patriarchal structure of families. The Marxism suggest males are the dominant of the whole family. They see the family as part of the subculture to the capitalist society and the Bourgeoisie, which they believe does not operate in the interest of all of the members of society but in the interest of the capitalist class. Therefore they are critical of the Functionalist theories as unlike functionalists who see the family as a harmonious institution, they see the family as a place of conflict, with dissimilar relations of power between its members. Zaretsky (1976) argues that the family is simply VIEW DOCUMENT
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Education and Sociology

1094 words - 5 pages To explain the role of education we need to look at education through different theories, a theory is a way of looking at the world. Within Sociology there are a number of theories, these include; Functionalism, Marxism, Interactionism, Feminism and Post-modern theory. Functionalists believe that society is made up of four parts; the Economy, the family, decision making and education. They believe that each part functions for the good of the whole. French Sociologist Emile Durkheim defined the major function of education from a Functionalist view as “the transmission of society’s norms and values”, the role of education is to socialise children into these norms and values which include VIEW DOCUMENT
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Marxist Theories (Crime and Deviance)

1753 words - 8 pages crimes. Jones looked at the crime rates of Switzerland and found that they were exceedingly low, despite it being a capitalist society. Left Realists would argue that while white collar crime is inevitably underreported, working class crimes affect people more on a personal and economic level. Marxists, however, ignore this fact. Postmodernists would argue that society is now too fragmented for Marxism to apply anymore The Corporate Homicide Act (2007) has been developed to deal with corporate crime. In response to the criticisms of traditional Marxist theory of crime, the Neo Marxist theory was brought about. Sociologists Taylor, Walton and Young, as mentioned in Item A, attempted to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Mapping Legal Theory

952 words - 4 pages natural essence but rather, it is just a human construct. More significantly, artifactualism signals some particular sort of jurisprudential gestalt. Theoretically, the jurisprudential inquiry was conceptualized through a paradigm which became the morality/law framework. From the discussion, all the perspectives of artifactualism (Marxism, Liberalism, Feminism, Critical Legal Studies and First Nations Legal Theory) have varying degrees of influence over artifactualism. I tend to think that critical studies have the greatest influence over artifactualism. Critical legal studies resonate with the theory of artifactualization to its largest extent. Although critical legal studies is less of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Assess the Marxist Views of the Roles of the Family

709 words - 3 pages Marxism is a macro theory based on the key concept of social classes; its main theorist is Karl Marx. The main Marxist views are that the class system is important, meaning that the lower classes work for the upper class; they also view that males are more dominant and are depended upon by women within society. These are all factors that contribute to serving the interests of capitalism. Marxists see all social institutions as serving the interests of capitalism - this includes the family, and they say that it serves the interests of capitalism by maintaining and advocating the class inequality and exploitation by the rich through the primary socialisation of children; the family VIEW DOCUMENT
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Freire's The Banking Concept Of Education

547 words - 3 pages Through Freire’s “ The Banking Concept of Education,'; we see the effects this concept has on it’s students and also we see the effects that the alternate concept, problem-posing has. The ‘banking’ concept allows the students to become vessels of knowledge, not being able to learn at a creative pace. By using communism, seeing through how education is taught in the classroom, it is parallel to Freire’s ‘banking’ concept. We can see that both ideas are similar and both were harmful to the human mind. While ‘banking’ poses the threat of creative growth and power, Marxism, which applies Marx VIEW DOCUMENT
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Che Guevara

735 words - 3 pages not trading only with communists and they were not givingunder developed countries aid. After April of l965, Guevara disappeared from the public eye. Castrodropped his association with Guevara because of Che's criticism. Che'splan at that time was to bring about Marxism by starting a world-widerevolution. He went around the world with forces (120 Cubans). In Congo,they attempted to accomplish one of these revolutions. It fell short whenBelgian aid arrived to help the current government. Che had little help fromthe rebels of Congo and eventually failed. His final days were spent inBolivia where he used bad judgment by trying to start a revolution. Histroops were crushed, and he was VIEW DOCUMENT
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Sociology: Class Stratification

596 words - 3 pages Sociology Class Stratification: Marxism Study: Sociologists John Westergaard and Henrietta Resler carried out a study entitled “Class in a Capitalist Society” (1976). They concentrated their analysis in British society, which they claimed was dominated by the ruling class. For them the ruling class consisted of; owners of the means of production, company directors, top managers, higher professionals and senior civil servants, combined these makes up only around 5-10% of the entire population. Westergaard and Resler argued that the major divisions of class and society are between capital and labour power and that private ownership of capital explains these VIEW DOCUMENT
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Marxist Interpretation: Civil Rights Movement

622 words - 3 pages materialism because racial oppression within the South was eventually brought to an end. Marxism proves to be a relevant form of interpretation for the Civil Rights Movement because many of the events during the movement are relevant to Marxist theory. According to the German philosopher Karl Marx, societies pass through economic and social stages. He believed that the process through which a society shifted from one stage to another, the dialectic, was a difficult and immense process. Indeed, the Civil Rights Movement within the United States was an incredibly strenuous process that took years to accomplish. As Marx had theorized, when the lower class of a society became discontent with VIEW DOCUMENT
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To What Extent Do You Agree That a Revolution Happened in Germany at the End of World War I

671 words - 3 pages but it wasn’t a united force. There were three main strands; the SPD who wanted to create a socialist republic by parliamentary democracy under Ebert, the USPD who wanted the same but governed by workers’ and soldiers councils in conjunction with a parliament, and the Spartacists who wanted to create a soviet republic based on the rule of workers’ and soldiers’ councils lead by Luxemburg and Liebeknecht. The Spartacists were a far left group and wanted to follow the same path as Communist Russia. Their main aim was to create a soviet republic based on the rule of the proletariat. This was the industrial working class who, in Marxist theory, would take power in the state. Marxism is defined VIEW DOCUMENT
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Marxist Critique of the Grinch Who Stole Christmas

528 words - 3 pages protested the commercialization of Christmas. Seuss’s work is very obviously Marxist-based, as it spoke clearly on issues of discrimination, ostracism and misplaced values. Marxism is different than ‘other progressive movements because Marxists always struggle to overcome the manifold forms of domination and exploitation in and through the self-emancipation of the working class’ (Marxists.org). Dr. Seuss could be interpreted as protesting against this exploitation of the public by the capitalists and corporations, by creating a work that states that ““Maybe Christmas,” he thought, “doesn’t come from a store. Maybe Christmas…perhaps…means a little bit more!”” (Geisel, 1957). Seuss, it seems, was of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Assess the Effects of Policies Designed to Create an Education Market in Uk

635 words - 3 pages Thatcher’s educational reform act. Despite Marketization offering a format whereby schools are forced to raise standards policies that lead to the marketization of education have also be criticised as simply ways of reproducing and legitimating inequality from conflict theories such as Marxism; Stephen Ball (1994) & Geoff Whitty (1998) examined that ways that marketization both reproduce and legitimate inequality and found that exam league tables and the funding formula are ways that this can be done. Parentocracy (the empowerment of parental choice) was achieved by the publication of school exam results so that parents would be able to choose the best school for their children; the higher VIEW DOCUMENT
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Karl Marx Philosophy

584 words - 3 pages How does Karl Marx philosophy enrich our understanding of Theory of Knowledge? The philosopher we chose for our project is Karl Marx. Karl Marx was a revolutionary socialist who believed in equality amongst people and his views on politics, economy and society, also known as Marxism, were the base of communism in the 20th century. Karl Marx believed that “democracy” or “capitalism” was just a “dictatorship of the bourgeois” because the wealthier class would take advantage of their position to their own benefit. Well he was in the most part right because in modern day democracy the middle and high class are the ones who have the control in most positions inside the government, and some VIEW DOCUMENT
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Sociology

582 words - 3 pages DEVIANCE- looks at the person and labels them deviant MORAL ENTREPRENEUR- individual group which aims to influence norms DEVIANT CAREER- live your life as a deviant person MASTER STATUS- helps indentify characteristics of individual MORAL PANIC- anxiety or alarm of a problem that threatens society FOLK DEVIL- someone who is a bad influence on society MORTIFICATION OF SELF- inmates are degraded and treated unhumanly NEGOTIATION OF JUSTICE 2.WHAT DO INTERACTIONISTS THINK OF MENTAL ILLNESS? 3.OUTLINE 2 CRITICIMS OF INTERACTIONIST THEORIES OF DEVIANCE Labelling theory fails to explain why people are deviant in first place. Once someone is labelled deviant they follow through. MARXISM 12 MARKS VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Failure of Culture

1130 words - 5 pages subdialectic narrative implies that language serves to marginalize the Other. Thus, the characteristic theme of Hubbard’s[8] critique of the modern paradigm of expression is a mythopoetical totality. 4. Consensuses of stasis The main theme of the works of Burroughs is the difference between sexual identity and society. The premise of dialectic Marxism states that the raison d’etre of the reader is significant form. But an abundance of deappropriations concerning not sublimation, as Sartre would have it, but neosublimation exist. “Sexual identity is responsible for the status quo,” says Sontag; however, according to Prinn[9] , it is not so much sexual identity that is responsible for the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Dependancy and Underdevelopment in Third World

2892 words - 12 pages The most persuasive theory of development is the Orthodox Marxism theory. The Orthodox Marxism theory basically helps to describe, explain and predict development and economic growth of any country in the world as outlined in the works of Marxists found in the “Capitalist and Communist Manifesto” whereby they argue that development occurs and attains its peak of development and economic growth in society where the social and economic level was at the communist stage characterized by every person in society is rewarded according to their needs. Karl Marx states that the society will always move forward because of the conflicts that emerge in one stage of development in a society. For VIEW DOCUMENT
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Functionalism, Maxism

4332 words - 18 pages Question Use sociological terminology to describe the principal sociological perspectives of Functionalism, Marxism, Interactionism, collectivism, postmodernism and The New Right. Functionalism This is the sociological approach that sees the social institutions of the society as working in agreement with each other, making specific and clear contributions towards the running of society. Functionalism is one of the oldest theories that are still used today. In functionalism society is made up of different social institution such as education, religion, media etc that work together to keep the society secure. Functionalism relies very much on these institutions that for society VIEW DOCUMENT
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Karl Marx, A Summary Of His Life

5480 words - 22 pages good deal of attention to the affair in the preface to the fourth edition of Capital -- which, likewise, did not put the matter to rest. Engels claimed that it was not The Morning Star but the Times that Marx was following. Indeed, critics of Marxism such as the journalist Paul Johnson continue to invoke Marx's supposed misquotation as evidence of general dishonesty. One can find a straightforward unravelling of this dispute in David A. Felix' work, Marx As Politician (London, 1983).The International survived the controversy, however, collapsing in 1872 in part because of the fall of the Paris Commune, and in part because many members turned to Mikhail Bakunin's anarchism. In London VIEW DOCUMENT
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Security Issue in the Asia-Pacific Region

3163 words - 13 pages development. Therefore, cultural politics is a good term, which makes some explanations such as Marxism around the conflict issues between China, Japan and America well. There are two main social ideology existed in the world. One is China represents the largest communism countries, and another is America represents the biggest capitalism countries. Following many years, these two ideologies result in many panics around the world. For example, during the Cold War, the Berlin Wall divided the world into two different ideologies countries. However, the Soviet Union policy has disassembled, but the threat between capitalists and proletarians still exist as a special phenomenon in the world. The VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Rise of Communism in Russia

2453 words - 10 pages system and the ownership of property. Just as the feudal system had given way to capitalism, so in time capitalism would give way to socialism. The class struggle of the future would be between the bourgeoisie, who were the capitalist employers, and the proletariat, who were the workers. The struggle would end, according to Marx, in the socialist revolution and the attainment of full communism (Groiler's Encyclopedia). Socialism, of which "Marxism-Leninism" is a takeoff, originated in the West. Designed in France and Germany, it was brought into Russia in the middle of the nineteenth century and promptly attracted support among the country's educated, public-minded elite, who at that time VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Rise of Communism in Russia

2569 words - 11 pages rooted in the economic system and the ownership of property. Just as the feudal system had given way to capitalism, so in time capitalism would give way to socialism. The class struggle of the future would be between the bourgeoisie, who were the capitalist employers, and the proletariat, who were the workers. The struggle would end, according to Marx, in the socialist revolution and the attainment of full communism (Groilers Encyclopedia). Socialism, of which Marxism-Leninism is a takeoff, originated in the West. Designed in France and Germany, it was brought into Russia in the middle of the nineteenth century and promptly attracted support among the countrys educated, public VIEW DOCUMENT
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Who Won the Cold War?

2279 words - 10 pages governance which advocates capitalism and individual liberty, entailing a liberal democratic way of carrying out its internal affairs (Knutson 1997: 234). On the other end of the spectrum, the USSR has experienced centuries of by and large authoritarian monarchical rule, which gave rise to particular social fractures thatembraced a particular form of communism, namely Marxism-Leninism (Kramer 1999: 539).Marxism-Leninism which became the governing principle of Russia in 1917includes the notion of collective ownership and centrally planned allocation of resources, both of which lack the major tenants of capitalist democratic governance. It was the opposing natures of the two ideologies and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Social Democracy

2302 words - 10 pages ideas of Karl Marx. Many related movements, including Pacifism, Anarchism, and Syndicalism, arose at the same time and had various quite different objections to Marxism. The social democrats, who were the majority of socialists at this time, did not reject Marxism , but wanted to reform it in certain ways and tone down their criticism of capitalism. They argued that socialism should be achieved through evolution rather than revolution. Such views were strongly opposed by the revolutionary socialists, who argued that any attempt to reform capitalism was doomed to fail, because the reformers would be gradually corrupted and eventually turn into capitalists themselves. Despite their VIEW DOCUMENT
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Barangay Information System

2309 words - 10 pages , or provinces) retain a degree of self-government; ultimate sovereign power rests with the voters who chose their governmental representatives. Islamic republic - a particular form of government adopted by some Muslim states; although such a state is, in theory, a theocracy, it remains a republic, but its laws are required to be compatible with the laws of Islam.  Maoism - the theory and practice of Marxism-Leninism developed in China by Mao Zedong (Mao Tse-tung), which states that a continuous revolution is necessary if the leaders of a communist state are to keep in touch with the people.  Marxism - the political, economic, and social principles espoused by 19th century economist Karl VIEW DOCUMENT